Choosing how to eat healthy article Healthy Fats
Choosing how to eat healthy article Healthy Fats
Siri-Tarino, P. W., Sun, Q., Hu, F. B., & Krauss, R. M. . Saturated Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Modulation by Replacement Nutrients. Current Atherosclerosis Reports, 12, 384–390. s/PMC2943062/ Reach for the nuts.  You can add nuts to vegetable dishes, use them instead of breadcrumbs on chicken or fish, or make your own trail mix with nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. By understanding the difference between good and bad fats and how to include more healthy fat in your diet, you can improve how well you think and feel, boost your energy, and even trim your waistline. Marx, W., Moseley, G., Berk, M., & Jacka, F. . Nutritional psychiatry: The present state of the evidence. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 76, 427–436. S0029665117002026 Liao, Y., Xie, B., Zhang, H., He, Q., Guo, L., Subramaniapillai, M., Fan, B., Lu, C., & Mclntyer, R. S. . Efficacy of omega-3 PUFAs in depression: A meta-analysis. Translational Psychiatry, 9, 190. s41398-019-0515-5 For decades, doctors, nutritionists, and health authorities have told us that a diet high in saturated fats raises blood cholesterol and increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. However, recent studies have made headlines by casting doubt on those claims, concluding that people who eat lots of saturated fat do not experience more cardiovascular disease than those who eat less. Authors: Lawrence Robinson, Jeanne Segal, Ph.D., and Robert Segal, M.A. Trans fat . Small amounts of naturally occurring trans fats can be found in meat and dairy products but it’s artificial trans fats that are considered dangerous. This is the worst type of fat since it not only raises bad LDL cholesterol but also lowers good HDL levels. Artificial trans fats can also create inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, stroke, and other chronic conditions and contributes to insulin resistance, which increases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Eat omega-3 fats every day.  Include a variety of fish sources as well as plant sources such as walnuts, ground flax seeds, flaxseed oil, canola oil, and soybean oil. As the Delta variant of COVID-19 surges, we urgently need you to help us reach millions suffering right now with mental health challenges. Despite the health benefits, nearly all seafood contains traces of pollutants, including the toxic metal mercury. The concentration of pollutants increases in larger fish, so avoid eating shark, swordfish, tilefish, and king mackerel. Most adults can safely eat 12 oz. of cooked seafood a week. For women who are pregnant, nursing mothers, and children under 12, choose fish lower in mercury, such as shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, Pollock, or catfish. You can also protect yourself by varying the types of fish that you include in your diet. Saturated fat. While not as harmful as trans fat, saturated fat can raise bad LDL cholesterol and too much can negatively impact heart health, so it’s best consumed in moderation. While there’s no need to cut out all saturated fat from your diet, most nutrition experts recommend limiting it to 10% of your daily calories. The American Heart Association recommends that people with documented heart disease get about 1 gram of EPA plus DHA per day. For the rest of us, the AHA recommends eating at least two 3.5 oz. servings of fish per week. Research has shown that a diet rich in omega-3s may help to: Polyunsaturated fat – good sources include: In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration has effectively outlawed the use of artificial trans-fats in commercially prepared food and the World Health Organization has called on other governments around the world to eliminate the use of trans fats by 2023. However, products made before the FDA ban may still be available for sale. Since products can be listed as having “zero trans fats” even if they contain up to 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving, it’s still important to carefully read food labels. Look for ingredients referred to as “partially hydrogenated oils.” These hidden sources of artificial trans fats can add up quickly. If your country still allows the use of artificial trans fats, remember that no amount is considered safe, how to eat healthy article so aim to eliminate it from your diet. Dress your own salad.  Commercial salad dressings are often high in unhealthy fat or added sugars. Create your own healthy dressings with olive, flaxseed, or sesame oils.
While omega-3s are best obtained through food, there are many omega-3 and fish oil supplements available. Fish oil contains no mercury and very low amounts of other contaminants. Larrieu, T., & Layé, S. . Food for Mood: Relevance of Nutritional Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Depression and Anxiety. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 1047. s.2018.01047 What these studies highlight is that when cutting down on saturated fats in your diet, it’s important to replace them with the right foods. For example, swapping animal fats for vegetable oils—such as replacing butter with olive oil—can help lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk for disease. However, swapping animal fats for refined carbohydrates—such as replacing your breakfast bacon with a bagel or pastry—won’t have the same benefits. That’s because eating refined carbohydrates or sugary foods can have a similar negative effect on your cholesterol levels, your risk for heart disease, and your weight. What are dietary fats? Fat is a type of nutrient, and just like protein and carbohydrates, your body needs some fat for energy, to absorb vitamins, and to protect your heart and brain health. For years we’ve been told that eating fat will add inches to your waistline, raise cholesterol, and cause a myriad of health problems. But now we know that not all fat is the same. Eat more avocados.  Try them in sandwiches or salads or make guacamole. Along with being loaded with heart- and brain-healthy fats, they make for a filling meal. Limiting your intake of saturated fat can still help improve your health—as long as you take care to replace it with good fat rather than refined carbs. In other words,  don’t go no fat, go good fat. The food industry likes to tout the benefits of tropical oils such as palm and coconut oil, while dietary guidelines shun them for being too high in saturated fat. So, who is right? “Bad” fats, such as artificial trans fats and saturated fats, are guilty of the unhealthy things all fats have been blamed for—weight gain, clogged arteries, an increased risk of certain diseases, and so forth. But “good” fats such as unsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids have the opposite effect. In fact, healthy fats play a huge role in helping you manage your moods, stay on top of your mental game, fight fatigue, and even control your weight. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025, 9th Edition. . s.gov/sites/default/files/2021-03/Dietary_Guidelines_for_Americans-2020-2025.pdf Snack on olives. Olives are high in healthy monounsaturated fats and make for a low-calorie snack. Try them plain or make a tapenade for dipping. Saturated fat – primary sources include: Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. . Scientific Report of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee . U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. s.gov/2020-advisory-committee-report Limit your intake of saturated fats  by replacing some of the red meat you eat with beans, nuts, poultry, and fish, and switching from whole milk dairy to lower fat versions. But don’t make the mistake of replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrates and sugary foods. Vegetable oils lower LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, and raise HDL cholesterol. Oils such as corn, sunflower, safflower, and soybean contain omega-6, a type of polyunsaturated fat that may help to reduce insulin resistance and inflammation. Adding more of these healthy fats to your diet may also help to make you feel more satisfied after a meal, reducing hunger and thus promoting weight loss . Our mission is to provide empowering, evidence-based mental health content you can use to help yourself and your loved ones. Tropical oils can have aa complex effect on blood cholesterol levels. For example, they can raise “bad” LDL cholesterol but also raise “good” HDL cholesterol, while their effects on other markers for heart disease are not yet clearly known. Cook with olive oil. Use olive oil for stovetop cooking rather than butter, stick margarine, or lard. For baking, try canola oil. Dietary fat plays a major role in your cholesterol levels. Cholesterol is a fatty, wax-like substance that your body needs to function properly. In and of itself, cholesterol isn’t bad. But when you get too much of it, it can have a negative impact on your health. As with dietary fat, there are good and bad types of cholesterol. Instead of obsessively counting fat grams, aim for a diet rich in a variety of vegetables, fruit, nuts, and beans, with two or more weekly servings of fatty fish, moderate amounts of dairy, small amounts of red meat, and only occasional fried or processed meals. Monounsaturated fat – good sources include: Since fat is an important part of a healthy diet, rather than adopting a low-fat diet, it’s more important to focus on eating more beneficial “good” fats and limiting harmful “bad” fats. Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats  are known as the “good fats” because they are good for your heart, your cholesterol, and your overall health. These fats can help to: HelpGuide uses cookies to improve your experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. Privacy Policy HELPGUIDEORG INTERNATIONAL is a tax-exempt 5013 organization . Our content does not constitute a medical or psychological consultation. See a certified medical or mental health professional for diagnosis.  Learn more. This might mean replacing fried chicken with grilled chicken, healthy eating articles for students Choosing how to eat healthy article Healthy FatsChoosing how to eat healthy article Healthy Fats